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Dr. Jane
Gilmour

MA PhD DClinPsy
Jane aims to deliver jargon-free science with warmth and humanity, to inspire change and improve young people’s life chances.
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Hard
Science

Warm
Heart

Areas of Expertise

Consultant Clinical Psychologist (Hon),Great Ormond Street Hospital

Course Director Infancy and Early Childhood Development MSc, UCL

Dr Jane Gilmour is a Consultant Clinical Psychologist (Hon) at Great Ormond Street Hospital, and Course Director for postgraduate child development programmes at University College London, where she lectures on neuropsychology, neurodevelopmental conditions (Tourette’s syndrome, autism, OCD) and therapeutic issues. She has published numerous academic articles and chapters on these topics.

 

Her media presence, commenting on young people’s well-being, includes appearances on BBC TV, BBC radio and broadsheet press commissions.

 

How to Have Incredible Conversations with your Child (co-authored with Dr Bettina Hohnen) is her latest book. Using an innovative format, families use the book together in a shared experience to strengthen communication skills and their relationship. She wrote (with co-authors Dr Bettina Hohnen and Dr Tara Murphy), best-seller The Incredible Teenage Brain Book (Everything You Need to Know to Unlock Your Teen’s Potential) which has been translated into numerous languages.

 

She aims to deliver jargon-free science with warmth and humanity, to inspire change and improve young people’s life chances. 

Academic and Teaching Awards

 

  • UCL Faculty Student Nominated Teaching Award (Population Health Sciences) 2021

  • UCL Faculty Education Award (Population Health Sciences) 2020

  • Shortlisted - UCL Provost Education Award 2020  

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Academic Work

As Course Director for postgraduate child development programmes at University College London, she lectures on neuropsychology, neurodevelopmental conditions (Tourette’s syndrome, autism, OCD) and therapeutic issues. She has published numerous academic articles and chapters on these topics.

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Clinical Practice

Jane is a Consultant Clinical Psychologist at Great Ormond Street Hospital, specialising in helping young people who have tics and Tourette’s syndrome

 

She does not accept private referrals.

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Public Engagement

Her media presence, commenting on young people’s well-being, includes appearances on BBC TV, BBC Radio and broadsheet press commissions.

Jane trains parents, teachers and professionals.

Books

Jane’s books (written with co-author Bettina Hohnen) translate evidence-based science into practical, relatable strategies for families.

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Media

Her media presence, commenting on young people’s well-being, includes appearances on BBC TV, BBC Radio and broadsheet press commissions.

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Helping your child with anxiety - BBC World Service, Health Check
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Helping your child with anxiety - BBC World Service, Health Check

With stories on Covid and Ukraine, the news cycle can seem distressing even for kids who are too young to pay attention to it, they can still pick up on anxiety amongst family and friends. What can you say to reassure them when you don't know the answers yourself? Subscribe - https://www.youtube.com/bbcworldservice Is the news cycle making children anxious? Consultant Clinical Psychologist Jane Gilmour tells us that children may be more aware of the news than we think, and shares tips for comforting them in the face of uncertainty. Tips: * Translate stories they're hearing into language they'll understand. * Open up the topic to see what's on their mind, "What do you want to know?", rather than, "What are you worried about?". * Be calm as you go about your daily life - your child will find that more reassuring than offering an answer you can't guarantee (ie, "Everything's going to be alright."). And for older children: * They will want to discover information for themselves and their peers. So teach them to critically evaluate the information. Praise them for finding this and show interest in it by watching or reading it together - and even fact check it with them. * If children are naturally anxious, they will need strategies to help them cope. Have a regular check in time, and ask your child to write, draw, or record what they're worried about and you can go through things together. * Teach them how to hold on to worries, and then talk through them with an adult. More on the war in Ukraine here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLz_B0PFGIn4fOM5lsRoJ0liaiBorTiRvl Website: https://www.bbc.co.uk/worldserviceradio Twitter: https://twitter.com/bbcworldservice Facebook: https://facebook.com/bbcworldservice

Podcasts

Incredible Conversation with Jane Gilmour & Bettina Hohnen: A podcast for parents and teachers supporting young people.
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Podcasts

Children and teens are watching us all the time. What are we teaching them as their role models, and how can we support them to unlock their incredible potential?